Effectiveness Monitoring Committee Request for Research Proposals

Portal ID:
12632
Status:
Active
Opportunity Type:
  • Grant
Last Updated:
 | 

Details

Purpose:

The Effectiveness Monitoring Committee (EMC) funds robust scientific research aimed at testing the efficacy of the California Forest Practice Rules and related regulations. The EMC is seeking project proposals that: 1) Address one or more of the critical monitoring questions identified in the EMC 2018 Strategic Plan, and/or 2) Address natural resource protection issues that are important for California forestlands.

Description:

The EMC is seeking project proposals that: (1) Address one or more of the critical monitoring questions identified in the EMC 2018 Strategic Plan, and (2) Address natural resource protection issues that are important for California forestlands. The critical monitoring questions are organized under 11 themes:

1. Watercourse and Lake Protection Zone (WLPZ) riparian function, 2. Watercourse channel sediment, 3. Road and WLPZ sediment, 4. Mass wasting sediment, 5. Fish habitat, 6. Wildfire hazard, 7. Wildlife habitat: species and nest sites, 8. Wildlife habitat: seral stages, 9. Wildlife habitat: cumulative impacts, 10. Wildlife habitat: structures, 11. Hardwood values

Projects that address multiple EMC themes and critical monitoring questions within a given theme will generally be ranked higher than those that only address a single theme and critical question, particularly if the projects align with the EMC’s prioritized critical questions in that funding year. Among the 11 above-referenced themes, the EMC has prioritized the following five thematic questions for Fiscal Year (FY) 2022/23, though this shall not exclude compelling thematic questions posed outside of the below list:

• Question 6c: Are the FPRs and associated regulations effective in managing fuel loads, vegetation patterns and fuel breaks for fire hazard reduction?• Question 11a: Are the FPRs and associated regulations effective in retaining diverse forests with a mixture of tree species that includes hardwoods [14 California Code of Regulations (CCR) § 897 (b)(1)]?• Question 6a: Are the FPRs and associated regulations effective in treating post-harvest slash and slash piles to modify fire behavior?• Question 5b: Are the FPRs and associated regulations effective in maintaining and restoring the distribution of foraging, rearing and spawning habitat for anadromous salmonids?• Question 8b: Are the FPRs and associated regulations effective in maintaining or increasing the amount and distribution of late succession forest stands for wildlife?

An individual project proponent may request and be awarded up to the full amount available ($931,216) for funding in three consecutive FYs: $130,091 in FY 2022/23, $376,125 in FY 2023/24, and $425,000 in FY 2024/25. Applicants requesting more than the amount available for funding will not be considered. While the EMC may choose to fund projects that span multiple FYs, up to the available funding amount, the EMC prefers to fund multiple research projects annually. Proposers should keep this in mind when developing their project and annual budget requests. Projects lasting more than three years may re-apply through the competitive grants process.

The Initial Concept Proposal is due on Wednesday, September 14, 2022 at 5:00 pm Pacific Daylight Time. If endorsed, the EMC will request a more detailed Full Project Proposal generally in September, which will generally be due in October 2022 on the date provided in the email notification. The EMC will generally complete the review of Full Project Proposals and make any funding recommendations at the December EMC meeting.

Eligibility Requirements

Eligible Applicants:

  • Business
  • Individual
  • Nonprofit
  • Public Agency
  • Tribal Government

Eligible applicants are local, state, and federal agencies including federal land management agencies; institutions of higher education; special purpose districts (e.g., public utilities districts, fire districts, conservation districts, and ports); Native American tribes; private landowners; for-profit entities; and non-profit 501(c)(3) organizations (e.g., fire safe councils, land trusts). 

Eligible Geographies:

Proposed projects that have broad application throughout California forestlands both public and private will be ranked higher than those with application limited to a specific geomorphic region or sub-region. Projects need not be physically located in California to produce findings that apply to multiple areas in the state.

Matching Funding Requirement:

Matching funds are not required, but should be detailed in the budget. 

Important Dates

Application deadline The date (and time, where applicable) by which all applications must be submitted to the grantor.
Expected award announcement The date on which the grantor expects to announce the recipient(s) of the grant.
December 31, 2022
Period of performance The length of time during which the grant money must be utilized.
Complete by 03/31/25

Funding Details

Total estimated available funding The total projected dollar amount of the grant.
$931,216
Expected number of awards A single grant opportunity may represent one or many awards. Some grantors may know in advance the exact number of awards to be given. Others may indicate a range. Some may wish to and wait until the application period closes before determining how many awards to offer; in this case, a value of “Dependent” will display.
Dependent
Estimated amount per award Grant opportunities representing multiple awards may offer awards in the same amount or in varied amounts. Some may wish to wait until the application period closes before determining per-award amounts; in this case, a value of “Dependent” will display.
Dependent
Letter of Intent Required? Certain grants require that the recipient(s) provide a letter of intent.
No
Requires Matched Funding? Certain grants require that the recipient(s) be able to fully or partially match the grant award amount with another funding source.
No
Funding Source: The funding source allocated to fund the grant. It may be either State or Federal (or a combination of both), and be tied to a specific piece of legislation, a proposition, or a bond number.
  • State

Funding Source Notes:

The Timber Regulation and Forest Restoration Fund (TRFRF) Program is a component of Assembly Bill 1492 (Committee on Budget, Chapter 289, Statutes of 2012). Up to $425,000 is allocated annually from the TRFRF Program to fund robust scientific research aimed at testing the efficacy of the California Forest Practice Rules and other natural resource protection statutes, laws, codes, and associated regulations. 

Funding Method: The manner in which the grant funding will be delivered to the awardee. Funding methods include reimbursements (where the recipient spends out-of-pocket and is reimbursed by the grantor) and advances (where the recipient spends received grant funds directly).
  • Reimbursement(s)

Funding Method Notes:

Total amount available over three years is $931, 216. Only costs incurred consistent with the approved scope of work and budget will be reimbursed. Payments will be made on a reimbursement basis. No work prior to or after the grant period will be reimbursable. Expect payment to be issued 45 to 60 calendar days from the time an acceptable invoice is received. If an invoice is incomplete or non-reimbursable, it will be returned to the grantee.

How to Apply

State agencies/departments recommend you read the full grant guidelines before applying.

Resources

For questions about this grant, contact:
Kristina Wolf, 1-916-215-4947, kristina.wolf@bof.ca.gov